Creative Comic Book Illustrations

Creative Comic Book Illustrations

In the summer of 2000, X-Men was released. It earned over $296 million worldwide, and it spawned a new trend in cinema for superheroes. Spiderman, Batman and even cult graphic novel The Watchmen were transposed to the silver screen.

Given the nature of comic books and graphic novels, this trend is an obvious one. The comic book format is highly visual, and the storytelling is brief yet action-packed, making it a natural fit for films, which also have limited run times and lots of visual impact.

Still, there are things that comic books can do that movies cannot quite replicate. The languid nature of dreams, the indescribable feelings of a disease and other experiences that are not literal enough to be photographed can be explored in the illustrations of comic books. The images below show just how creative these illustrations can be.

Epileptic

by David B.

This graphic novel explores the effect of epilepsy on David B.’s brother and on himself. It uses experimental, figurative illustrations to show his experiences with the disorder.

Epileptic

Joker

by Brian Azzarello and Lee Bermejo

Taking the Batman ethos and turning it on its head, this novel focuses on the Joker. As a result, the illustrations are horrific and graphic.

Joker

Scott Pilgrim’s Precious Little Life

by Bryan Lee O’Malley

The Scott Pilgrim series is widely considered the first graphic novel for the video game generation. It combines the aesthetic of both Japanese manga and Western comic books with elements of video games and music videos to create a unique style.

Scott Pilgrim’s Precious Little Life

Superman story in Action Comics #1

by Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster

This comic contained the first appearance of Superman, the first true superhero in comic books. The style of the illustration was fairly common, but creation of a being that was super-human was anything but.

Superman story in Action Comics

Maus

by Art Spiegelman

Maus tells the story of Jews during the Holocaust by showing mice struggling against ruthless cats. The illustration was highly symbolic and evocative, heightening the emotion of the storytelling.

Maus

Jimmy Corrigan: The Smartest Kid on Earth

by Chris Ware

This book is more like a collection of highly designed postcards, with its intricate drawings and stunning landscapes. It tells the story of Jimmy Corrigan with flashbacks, parallel stories and diagrams.

Jimmy Corrigan: The Smartest Kid on Earth

Fold-ins in Mad Magazine created

by Al Jaffee

This series of drawings, which close the influential comic book, make the magazine interactive whilst satirising the emergence of fold-out panorama features in other magazines in the mid-1960s.

Fold-ins in Mad Magazine created

Fables: Volume 1: Legends In Exile

by Bill Willingham

Fables

Palomar: The Heartbreak Soup Stories

by Gilbert Hernandez

Following the residents of fictional town Palomar, this novel paints a detailed portrait of life in Central America. This can result in surreal images of Frida Kahlo, the devil and a skeleton.

Palomar

Blankets

by Craig Thompson

Blankets is an autobiographical tale of two brothers competing with each other as they grown up in snowy Wisconsin. Craig, the main character, often escapes his tedious life by fantasising and drawing, which is shown in the dream-like illustrations.

Blankets

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Helen Bains

Helen Bains

This is a guest post contributed by Print Express UK. They are currently holding a comic book competition.
Helen Bains

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  • Rod Tolentino

    I’m a big fan of BATMAN and i love the comic book illustration of Joker here. He’s creepy and yes he is scary. Joker is one of my favorite villain of batman. Awesome pick! Cheers!

    [Reply]

  • Aj Aviado

    i bought the brian azzarello and lee bermejo Joker graphic novel a few months ago. its awesome. :) thanks for sharing these :)

    [Reply]

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